Recommendations for bird care
NUTRITION :

The diversity of bird species is great and it is difficult to reproduce the exact type of nutrition that a particular species would have in the wild. In any case, the nutritional needs of a wild bird versus pets are often different.

There are several types of bird feeds available on the market:

  • Be sure to always check the expiry date upon purchase and, once opened, check the food’s freshness regularly. To prolong the freshness of the food, keep it in a cool, dry place.
  • Choose a feed without additives or dyes. We recommend the following brands: Harrison’s®, Hagen® (Tropican feed) and Lafeber®.

EXAMPLES OF VEGETABLES :
YELLOW AND ORANGE: squash, sweet potatoes, carrots, pumpkin, peppers. DARK GREEN: cabbage, lettuce, arugula, herbs, etc.

EXAMPLES OF FRUITS :

Berries, tropical fruits, pomegranate, apricot, orange, kiwi, etc.

The important thing is to vary the presentation to provide a game and a little work for your bird at the same time as it feeds. This will stimulate her further and pique her curiosity. You can offer these to your bird raw or cooked, in strips, mashed, in large or small pieces, etc.

Be careful to avoid excess weight gain. Legumes and whole grain products are quite rich and should be avoided if your bird has become overweight. Oily seeds such as walnuts, hazelnuts, almonds, and pecans should also be avoided.

Any dietary change should be done gradually to avoid a refusal to eat, which could have serious consequences. Consult your veterinarian to establish a food plan adapted to your bird.

L'alimentation du lapin
Laisser le lapin libre pour l'exercice
Laisser le lapin libre pour l'exercice
TOXIC PRODUCTS FOR BIRDS
Household products

  • perfumes
  • Cleaning products (Vim, Windex, etc)
  • non-stick frying pans (T-Fal, teflon)
  • bleach

Lead

  • batteries
  • paint

Zinc

  • galvanized metal
  • paperclips and pennies
Food

  • chocolate
  • tea, coffee, alcohol
  • rhubarb
  • avocado
  • parsley (unconfirmed)
  • garlic, onions, chives, shallots, leeks (unconfirmed)

Plants

  • Rhododendron
  • Azalia
  • Philodendron
  • Iris
Plants (continued)

  • Trichodesma incanum
  • Thrush
  • Astralagus
  • Phytoacca americana
  • Sesbania sp
  • Arbus precatorius
  • Bird of paradise
  • Arctium minus
  • Petroselium sativatum
  • Parthenocissus
  • Colocasia sp
  • Asclepia
  • Miniature rose
  • Hyacinthe
  • Pointsettia
  • Kalanchoe sp
  • Quereus sp
  • Montana rubens
  • Tobacco plant
  • Solonum sp
  • Ricinus communis
  • Hydrangea
  • Diffenbachia
  • Nerlum oleander
  • Alocasia sp
  • Microcystis aeruginosa
  • Acgopodium podograria
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    Environment

    ENRICHING THE ENVIRONMENT: AVOIDING ADVERSE BEHAVIOR AND TICS

    In the wild, birds often live in groups so loneliness is an important source of stress for our birds at home. To avoid this, share your daily activities with your bird! (Ex: going on errands, visiting a friend, having lunch with you, etc.) Be sure beforehand, however, that the situation is safe.

    In the wild, birds spend a lot of time foraging, which means you should make his search for food more of a challenge. For example, you could hide the food or present it to him in various ways, in different places, in his cage or even in the house. The goal is to make a game of it, by letting him spend a little time finding his food.

    Several food games can be found in pet shops and several serious websites may also have good suggestions. You may also be inspired and make these games yourself out of objects you may find in your recycling bin!

    Please remember, however, that your bird must always have access to his staple foods in case he does not understand the trick of the game you are proposing.

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